My Back Hurts When I Go For a Run

Back view of young fitness woman running on the road in the morning. Running is a fantastic way to stay in shape and can be a terrific form of self-care. Few activities can match the excitement of crushing your records and achieving new milestones.

However, there are circumstances when running too often can affect your back. Also, certain spinal conditions can affect your ability to run consistently. If you have back pain from running or jogging, it might be time to listen to your body and look for the cause.

How Running Can Benefit You

If you are an avid runner, you understand its merits.

Running has several physical benefits in addition to its psychological rewards. Running helps you to:

  • Improve cardiovascular health
  • Lower blood sugar
  • Reduce stress
  • Improve bone health
  • And control your weight

Can I Still Run With Back Problems?

 Running may be essential to you. However, continuing to run despite back pain can make things much worse. Since running exposes your back to constant impact, you risk further structural damage to your spine if you push your back too hard. If you suffer from a back condition such as degenerative disk disease, sciatica, or have a herniated disc, consider taking some time off to correct the issue. Falling in love with the benefits of running is easy, and the temptation to push yourself is understandable. But persisting through back pain is a risky business. 

When Should I See a Doctor?

If back pain persists when you try to run, it’s crucial to find out why. Most common backaches resolve themselves quickly and easily. However, if your pain lasts more than two weeks, it’s time to see a specialist. A spine specialist can look closer with a spinal x-ray, spinal MRI, or other imaging technology to help establish a cause.

How Can I Treat My Back and Still Exercise?

If your back is hurting your ability to stay active, there are multiple low-impact exercises you can do while your back heals. These include:

  • Swimming
  • Stationary biking
  • Exercise walking
  • Elliptical training

However, remember to consult your doctor to determine the frequency and intensity level that’s safe for you to exercise. Typically, minor back pain is handled by resting, compression, and taking over-the-counter pain medications. 

When Should I See a Doctor?

Typically, minor back pain is handled by resting, compression, and taking over-the-counter pain medications. But when these methods are ineffective, it’s time to try something else. If your pain lasts more than two weeks, it’s time to see a specialist. Dr. Todd Alber can look closer with a spinal x-ray, spinal MRI, or other imaging technology to help establish a cause. You don’t have to suffer from back pain. 

Let us help today. Call our NYC practice and schedule a consultation at 212-606-1004.

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